Live Earth Update

7.7.07


I feel its important at this point, while watching Jane Goodall of the Jane Goodall Institute welcome everyone from New York with the greeting call from the African Chimpanzee, that Alicia Keys, more than any other artist I've seen perform today, actually has a voice in the public to address the need for change. So I know its a bit early, but I'd like to personally thank Alicia Keys for being eloquent enough to speak to the message of Live Earth unlike many of her peers.

Ms. Key, an ambassador for the organization Keep a Child Alive Foundation that directs money to supplying AIDS drugs to children in Africa, not only addressed the audience in a welcoming way, but truly spoke to them unlike many of the other acts that have been deemed worthy to grace the stages of Live Earth. Also, for those not glued to the TV set and who may not have the priviledge to watch a rerun, Alicia Keys covered "Mercy Mercy Me: The Ecology" by Marvin Gaye from the album Chronicle. This song has been a staple of many of my playlists for years now and I feel its important for us to recognize what the meaning and impact of that song is. Take the time now, and read the lyrics. Remember this was written 30 years ago.


Oh, mercy mercy me

Oh, things ain't what they used to be

No, no

Where did all the blue sky go?

Poison is the wind that blows

From the north, east, south, and sea

Oh, mercy mercy me

Oh, things ain't what they used to be

No, no

Oil wasted on the oceans and upon our seas

Fish full of mercury

Oh, mercy mercy me

Oh, things ain't what they used to be

No, no

Radiation in the ground and in the sky

Animals and birds who live nearby are dying

Oh, mercy mercy me

Oh, things ain't what they used to be

What about this overcrowded land?

How much more abuse from man can you stand?

My sweet Lord

My sweet Lord

My sweet Lord


Marvin Gaye - Chronicles - Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)


I find it glaringly obvious that acts such as Ludacris and Akon, though popular, had very little to say as part of the concert. While their presence may have drawn viewers, I find it unfortunate that neither of them seemed to address the issues at hand. This isn't politics, its about consumer habits. You'd think that rappers, of any of the artists being representative of probably the most consumption based culture, hip hop culture, would jump in both feet first and get behind something like, I don't know, a boutique line of chrome rims from recycled chrome. I guess until you you can make solar panels cool and put them on hummers, these guys are going to keep pitting one side of the audience against the other to see which ones louder. What a wasted opportunity.

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